Student Political Bias

 The divide between Republicans and Democrats in Colorado is 44.3 percent for Clinton, and 37.0 percent for Trump.

The divide between Republicans and Democrats in Colorado is 44.3 percent for Clinton, and 37.0 percent for Trump.

Natalie Scott , Reporter

 

Durango High School Students have various political views and opinions. Many teens of this generation are highly influenced by media, peers, teachers, and their parents.

In Durango and in DHS the political bias, speaking in terms of liberal versus conservative, the divide seems to split right down the middle, which reflects the national divide as well.

“I’d say that I get some of my political bias from my parents, but I try to form my own opinions about issues. My opinions are based off my values and my values are in line with what my parents believe, but contrast from some as well,” said Jr. Max Sinberg. “I’d say that the majority of my friend group is relatively liberal, but I wouldn’t say that has too much influence on my political views. Honestly, I hear more conservative bias in the classroom than I do liberal views from my teachers.”

The difference between the conservative and liberal point of view is taught without personal opinion involved to help the students understand the real trump_vs-_clinton_by_statefacts so they can form more individualized opinions based off of the truth.

“In my government classes particularly I see bias because we are discussing the election, and I see a lot of misinformation. Something I am really trying to concentrate on teaching the students is the difference between an inflamed opinion and an informed opinion. I see a popular trend, especially on social media, of inflamed opinions,” said Government Teacher, Sarah Trautmann.